Greetings & Farewells

1 I am aware that in most Spanish-speaking cultures people greet each other with little personal space and increased physical contact, which often includes hugging and/or kissing on the cheeks.
2 I am aware that most people shake hands when saying hello/goodbye in semi-formal and formal situations.
3 I am aware that in most Spanish-speaking cultures people address others of a higher social status (elders, officers, professionals) and new acquaintances with the formal “you” (usted) and shake hands.
4 I am aware that farewells typically include well wishes or a reference to future contact, i.e. Nos vemos mañana, Que estés bien, Te llamo más tarde, etc.
5 I am aware that it is common to make many plans with friends and follow through with few of them.
6 I am aware that greeting and small talk are expected when getting to work.
7 I am aware that it is more common to ask questions requiring less detail, such as ¿Qué tal? or ¿Qué hubo? than to ask ¿Cómo estás?, which requires a more detailed answer, especially among friends and family.
8 I am aware that most Spanish-speakers express their emotions loudly and openly.
9 I am aware that when talking to people who are older or have a high rank usually a title is used. In formal situations señor, señora o señorita (or the person’s profession, i.e. arquitecto, ingeniero, licenciado) + last name is used, in semi-formal situations don or doña + first name is used.
10 I am aware when narrating happenings there is a stronger emphasis on feelings and not on the facts.
11 I am aware that most Spanish-speakers express their emotions loudly and openly.
12 I am aware that emotional expression typically involves some physical contact (touching of arm, embracing, kissing, etc.)

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